PROXIMATE ANALYSIS AND MINERAL COMPOSITION OF THE PEELS OF THREE VARIETIES OF SWEET CASSAVA

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NWAKOBY NNAMDI ENOCH
EJIMOFOR CHIAMAKA FRANCES
OLEDIBE ODIRA JOHNSON
AFAM-EZEAKU CHIKAODILI EZIAMAKA
MBAUKWU ONYINYE

Abstract

One of the most significant tubers grown in Africa, cassava provides around one-third of the daily calories consumed. It has several nutritional advantages and is often ingested after peeling, washing, boiling, or drying. The objective of this study was to ascertain the mineral and proximate content of cassava peels from 3 sweet varieties. The analysis was carried out using accepted methods. The outcome revealed that TMS/98/0581 has 2.84% protein content. TME/98/419 with 4.33% and TMS/98/30572 with 2.41%. The carbohydrate content showed that TMS/98/0581 has the lowest parameter with 72.20% while TMS/98/30572 has the highest with 75.82% followed by TME/98/419 with 75.20%. Also, the DM (Dry Matter) of TME/98/419 has the highest yielding with 87.51% followed by TMS/98/30572 with 86.95% while TMS/98/0581 has the lowest DM of 85.97%. The fat content of TME/98/419 yielded highest parameter of 1.09% followed by TMS/98/0581 with 0.46% and the least was TMS/98/30572 with 0.40%. The fiber content of TMS/98/0581 cultivar produced the least content with 5.44% followed by TMS/98/30572 with 6.13% and the highest been TME/98/419 with 6.62%. The peel further contained certain amount of minerals. The peel of cultivar TME/98/419 contained 19.81mg/100g which is the highest while TMS/98/30572 has the lowest with 13.74mg/100g followed by TMS/98/0581 16.23mg/100g. Zinc content of TME /98/419 yielded the highest parameter of 6.72mg/100g followed by TMS/98/30572 for 5.65mg/100g and the least is TMS/98/0581 with 5.36mg/100g. Furthermore, the magnesium content of TMS/98/0581 had the highest value of 14.81mg/100g followed by TME/98/419 with 14.40mg/100g and the least TMS/98/30572 with 12.80mg/100g. The result therefore showed that cassava peels could serve as supplementary source of essential nutrients for animal feeds with healthy benefits than its disposal.

Keywords:
Proximate analysis, mineral analysis, cassava peels

Article Details

How to Cite
ENOCH, N. N., FRANCES, E. C., JOHNSON, O. O., EZIAMAKA, A.-E. C., & ONYINYE, M. (2022). PROXIMATE ANALYSIS AND MINERAL COMPOSITION OF THE PEELS OF THREE VARIETIES OF SWEET CASSAVA. Asian Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 7(2), 35-41. https://doi.org/10.56557/ajmab/2022/v7i27987
Section
Original Research Article

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