INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF LOCALITY ON THE CARBON MONOXIDE LEVELS AND EFFECTS IN GUATEMALA

Main Article Content

GRACE LIM
CHELSEA LIM
SEONGHO HONG
YOONHA CHUN
YESEUNG MOON
MINSUH KIM
ZACHARY LUO
RACHEL JEON
SEAN OH

Abstract

Guatemala has been a developing country in a variety of aspects. As the country continues to rise industrially, it faces the major concerns of air pollution. The pollution within Guatemala has continued to rise into dangerous levels. There are major health risks associated with air pollution, including heart disease and chronic respiratory issues. Most under-developed countries face scarcity in the access of medical attention and the distribution of medicine because of insufficient funds, government support, and regulations. A key contributor to the dangers of air pollution is carbon monoxide (CO), an odorless and colorless poisonous gas. Emission of CO is most common through anthropogenic activities.  As a result of the rapid industrialization, increase in motor vehicles, and gradual activity post-quarantine, there has been a significant change in the carbon monoxide levels of the country.

The objective of this study was to quantify the carbon monoxide levels of Guatemala City (which consists of the largest urban population) and Tikal using the EasyLog USB-CO. The research team monitored many locations under various conditions: population, ventilation, transportation, and found their mutual relationship among the parameters. The study concluded that CO pollution was more prominent at places of dense population and increased anthropogenic activities.

Keywords:
Air pollution monitoring, carbon monoxide emission levels, environmental air pollution, urban atmosphere

Article Details

How to Cite
LIM, G., LIM, C., HONG, S., CHUN, Y., MOON, Y., KIM, M., LUO, Z., JEON, R., & OH, S. (2022). INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF LOCALITY ON THE CARBON MONOXIDE LEVELS AND EFFECTS IN GUATEMALA. Journal of Global Ecology and Environment, 16(4), 82-96. https://doi.org/10.56557/jogee/2022/v16i47872
Section
Original Research Article

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